Find the educational and advocacy support you need

Whether you’re looking for answers for you or your loved ones, want to connect with other people with metastatic colorectal cancer, or need help getting the care you need, there are many organizations that offer useful information, networking, and other support services. Here is a list of just a few organizations dedicated to helping people who have cancer.

These resources are independent of Lilly; Lilly does not control the content.

EDUCATION

  • Fight Colorectal Cancer
    (Fight CRC)

    Fight Colorectal Cancer is a patient empowerment organization based in Washington, DC. Through patient education, advocacy, and research funding, the group spreads awareness and advocates for a cure for the second-leading cancer killer in the United States. It serves as a resource for colorectal cancer patients, caregivers, family members, grassroots advocates, policymakers, and healthcare providers. Its website offers a free guide for newly diagnosed patients, webinars, newsletters, ways to connect with other survivors, advocacy awareness opportunities, and so much more. Check out its website at www.FightCRC.org and find it on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram (@FightCRC).

    Keep all the resources you need available at your fingertips with the iCancerHealthApp.

    Explore the educational resources, highlighted by “Your Guide in the Fight,” which includes diagnosis information, treatment options, health and well-being resources, and survivorship support that will help you through your cancer journey.

  • Colon Cancer Alliance

    The Colon Cancer Alliance was founded in 1999 by a group of 41 survivors, caregivers, and friends who saw the need to educate the public and provide support to those affected by colon cancer. Since then, the organization has grown to be the nation’s oldest and largest nonprofit dedicated to the disease, helping nearly 1.5 million patients and families every year. The Colon Cancer Alliance’s mission is simple: to knock colon cancer out of the top 3 cancer killers. Through prevention and treatment information, funding research, and providing patient and family support services, it has a vision for a future free of colon cancer.

    The Colon Cancer Alliance website offers a wide array of information on treatment options, side effect management, research, screening, and support services. Additionally, it provides monthly webinars with Q&A, group chats to learn from other patients, and an annual conference where those impacted by colon cancer can learn and connect.

  • Susan Cohan Colon Cancer Foundation (Susie’s Cause)

    Susie’s Cause is a national grassroots nonprofit organization dedicated to eliminating colorectal cancer as a lifethreatening disease through the development and dissemination of educational programs focused on prevention, early screening and detection, aggressive therapeutic intervention, and funding cuttingedge research. With a commitment to raise awareness about colorectal cancer in underserved communities, Susie’s Cause conducts its national Outreach Health Festivals together with Save Our Parents program in multiple cities across the country. Festival cities include: Baltimore, Harlem, Oakland, Los Angeles, Indianapolis, Detroit, Philadelphia, Louisville, Richmond and Miami. Save Our Parents bonds students with their families to motivate the students to encourage their parents to obtain early screening, and live a healthy lifestyle to reduce their risks of colon cancer.

    Learn more about colon cancer, how it affects the body, screening and prevention, the importance of diet, and more.

  • CancerCare®

    Founded in 1944, CancerCare is a national organization providing free professional support services and information to help people manage the emotional, practical, and financial challenges of cancer. The organization’s comprehensive services include counseling and support groups over the phone, online, and in person; educational workshops; publications; and financial and copayment assistance. All CancerCare services are provided by oncology social workers and worldleading cancer experts.

    CancerCare offers workshops, podcasts, Q&A sessions, and publications to help you and your loved ones better understand colorectal cancer, and the treatment and support available to you.

  • Cancer Support Community®

    The Cancer Support Community is a global nonprofit dedicated to providing support, education, and hope to people affected by cancer. The organization’s services are available free of charge through a network of professionally led, communitybased centers, hospitals, and community oncology practices, as well as online.

    Explore information and resources specific to colorectal cancer.

CAREGIVER SUPPORT

  • CancerCare®

    Founded in 1944, CancerCare is a national organization providing free professional support services and information to help people manage the emotional, practical, and financial challenges of cancer. The organization's comprehensive services include counseling and support groups over the phone, online, and in person; educational workshops; publications; and financial and co-payment assistance. All CancerCare services are provided by oncology social workers and worldleading cancer experts.

    The professional oncology social workers at CancerCare provide tips and advice for caregivers, including how you can help manage your loved one’s care, supporting your loved one emotionally, and caring for yourself.

  • Cancer Support Community®

    The Cancer Support Community is a global nonprofit dedicated to providing support, education, and hope to people affected by cancer. The organization’s services are available free of charge through a network of professionally led, communitybased centers, hospitals, and community oncology practices, as well as online.

    Dealing with a colorectal cancer diagnosis can be difficult for everyone involved, including family and friends. It can be an especially difficult conversation for children. There are resources and community support groups available to help.

COUNSELING AND SUPPORT

  • Fight Colorectal Cancer
    (Fight CRC)

    Fight Colorectal Cancer is a patient empowerment organization based in Washington, DC. Through patient education, advocacy, and research funding, the group spreads awareness and advocates for a cure for the second-leading cancer killer in the United States. It serves as a resource for colorectal cancer patients, caregivers, family members, grassroots advocates, policymakers, and healthcare providers. Its website offers a free guide for newly diagnosed patients, webinars, newsletters, ways to connect with other survivors, advocacy awareness opportunities, and so much more. Check out its website at www.FightCRC.org and find it on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram (@FightCRC).

    Keep all the resources you need available at your fingertips with the iCancerHealthApp.

    Fight CRC offers “My Colon Cancer Coach,” a tool designed to help you better understand the type of cancer you have, which allows you to have an informed discussion with your treatment team.

  • Colon Cancer Alliance

    The Colon Cancer Alliance was founded in 1999 by a group of 41 survivors, caregivers, and friends who saw the need to educate the public and provide support to those affected by colon cancer. Since then, the organization has grown to be the nation’s oldest and largest nonprofit dedicated to the disease, helping nearly 1.5 million patients and families every year. The Colon Cancer Alliance’s mission is simple: to knock colon cancer out of the top 3 cancer killers. Through prevention and treatment information, funding research, and providing patient and family support services, it has a vision for a future free of colon cancer.

    Call the Colon Cancer Alliance’s toll-free Helpline (1-877-422-2030) to be connected with a Certified Patient Support Navigator who can help guide your entire family through a cancer journey. Request a Buddy in its peer-to-peer Buddy Program, visit its online Facebook communities, or listen to podcasts about other patients’ journeys.

  • Susan Cohan Colon Cancer Foundation (Susie’s Cause)

    Susie’s Cause is a national grassroots nonprofit organization dedicated to eliminating colorectal cancer as a life-threatening disease through the development and dissemination of educational programs focused on prevention, early screening and detection, aggressive therapeutic intervention, and funding cutting-edge research. With a commitment to raise awareness about colorectal cancer in underserved communities, Susie’s Cause conducts its national Outreach Health Festivals together with Save Our Parents program in multiple cities across the country. Festival cities include: Baltimore, Harlem, Oakland, Los Angeles, Indianapolis, Detroit, Philadelphia, Louisville, Richmond and Miami. Save Our Parents bonds students with their families to motivate the students to encourage their parents to obtain early screening, and live a healthy lifestyle to reduce their risks of colon cancer.

    Seek answers from our staff and others who have been touched by colon cancer by calling us at (410) 244-1778.

  • CancerCare®

    Founded in 1944, CancerCare is a national organization providing free professional support services and information to help people manage the emotional, practical, and financial challenges of cancer. The organization's comprehensive services include counseling and support groups over the phone, online, and in person; educational workshops; publications; and financial and co-payment assistance. All CancerCare services are provided by oncology social workers and world-leading cancer experts.

    Connect with the appropriate groups to help with counseling, financial assistance, and community programs.

  • Cancer Support Community®

    The Cancer Support Community is a global nonprofit dedicated to providing support, education, and hope to people affected by cancer. The organization’s services are available free of charge through a network of professionally led, communitybased centers, hospitals, and community oncology practices, as well as online.

    As you go through your treatment journey, it’s important to seek emotional support for your well-being. There are resources and community groups available to help. You can also seek help by calling us at 1-888-793-9355.

ADVOCACY

  • Fight Colorectal Cancer
    (Fight CRC)

    Fight Colorectal Cancer is a patient empowerment organization based in Washington, DC. Through patient education, advocacy, and research funding, the group spreads awareness and advocates for a cure for the second-leading cancer killer in the United States. It serves as a resource for colorectal cancer patients, caregivers, family members, grassroots advocates, policymakers, and healthcare providers. Its website offers a free guide for newly diagnosed patients, webinars, newsletters, ways to connect with other survivors, advocacy awareness opportunities, and so much more. Check out its website at www.FightCRC.org and find it on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram (@FightCRC).

    Keep all the resources you need available at your fingertips with the iCancerHealthApp.

    There are many ways for you to get involved in the fight against colorectal cancer: change policy that affects the colorectal cancer community, raise awareness, support research, and raise money.

  • Colon Cancer Alliance

    The Colon Cancer Alliance was founded in 1999 by a group of 41 survivors, caregivers, and friends who saw the need to educate the public and provide support to those affected by colon cancer. Since then, the organization has grown to be the nation’s oldest and largest nonprofit dedicated to the disease, helping nearly 1.5 million patients and families every year. The Colon Cancer Alliance’s mission is simple: to knock colon cancer out of the top 3 cancer killers. Through prevention and treatment information, funding research, and providing patient and family support services, it has a vision for a future free of colon cancer.

    Let your voice be heard! Speak Up, Speak Out is the Colon Cancer Alliance’s advocacy series that provides the latest information about issues impacting the colon cancer community. Learn more about ways to get involved in your community.

  • Cancer Support Community®

    The Cancer Support Community (CSC) is a global nonprofit dedicated to providing support, education, and hope to people affected by cancer. The organization’s services are available free of charge through a network of professionally led, communitybased centers, hospitals, and community oncology practices, as well as online.

    The CSC promotes fundraising efforts, education, and community events to help raise awareness of the colorectal cancer community. Learn about the ways you can get involved.

FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE AND TRANSPORTATION

  • Colon Cancer Alliance

    The Colon Cancer Alliance was founded in 1999 by a group of 41 survivors, caregivers, and friends who saw the need to educate the public and provide support to those affected by colon cancer. Since then, the organization has grown to be the nation’s oldest and largest nonprofit dedicated to the disease, helping nearly 1.5 million patients and families every year. The Colon Cancer Alliance’s mission is simple: to knock colon cancer out of the top 3 cancer killers. Through prevention and treatment information, funding research, and providing patient and family support services, it has a vision for a future free of colon cancer.

    The Colon Cancer Alliance is committed to helping you face your treatment head on and overcome the barriers to screening. Through its Blue Hope Financial Assistance program, you can apply for financial assistance to help cover costs related to treatment or the expense of a screening test. A limited number of grants are distributed on a quarterly basis to qualified individuals.

  • CancerCare®

    Founded in 1944, CancerCare is a national organization providing free professional support services and information to help people manage the emotional, practical, and financial challenges of cancer. The organization’s comprehensive services include counseling and support groups over the phone, online, and in person; educational workshops; publications; and financial and co-payment assistance. All CancerCare services are provided by oncology social workers and world-leading cancer experts.

    CancerCare provides limited financial assistance to people affected by cancer. As a nonprofit organization, funding depends on the sources of support at any given time. If CancerCare does not currently have funding to assist you, its professional oncology social workers will always work to refer you to other financial assistance resources.

This information has been provided by the listed organizations, and Lilly is not responsible for the content. Its use on this site is not intended to serve as an endorsement of the listed organizations.

All thirdparty organization names and other trademarks are the property of their respective trademark owners. Those trademark owners are not affiliated with Lilly and they do not sponsor or endorse this material.

Important Safety Information

What is the most important information I should know about CYRAMZA?

WARNING: SEVERE BLEEDING, TEARS IN THE STOMACH OR BOWEL WALL, AND DIFFICULTY IN WOUND HEALING

Severe bleeding has occurred with CYRAMZA. These events are sometimes fatal. Tell your doctor right away if you have bleeding or symptoms of bleeding, including lightheadedness. Your treatment will have to be permanently stopped if severe bleeding occurs.

Tears in the stomach or bowel wall may occur with CYRAMZA. These events are sometimes fatal. Tell your doctor if you have severe diarrhea, vomiting, or severe abdominal pain. Your treatment will have to be permanently stopped if this occurs.

Wounds may have difficulty healing with drugs like CYRAMZA. Tell your doctor if you have a wound that doesn’t heal properly. If you develop a wound that won’t heal during treatment, your doctor will stop CYRAMZA until the wound is fully healed. Also tell your doctor if you have planned surgery, as CYRAMZA treatment should be interrupted prior to surgery. Your doctor may restart CYRAMZA after your surgical wound has healed.

  • Strokes, ministrokes, blood clots, and heart attacks have occurred in clinical trials with CYRAMZA. These events are sometimes fatal. Your treatment will have to be permanently stopped if these events occur.
  • Severe high blood pressure has occurred with CYRAMZA treatment. Your doctor will monitor your blood pressure every two weeks or more throughout treatment and may adjust, interrupt, or permanently stop treatment depending on the results. Tell your doctor if your blood pressure is high or if you have symptoms of high blood pressure, including severe headache or lightheadedness, or neurologic symptoms such as confusion, changes in your vision, or seizure.
  • Infusion reactions related to injecting CYRAMZA have occurred. Most of these reactions happened during or after the first or second CYRAMZA infusion. Signs and symptoms of infusion reactions include shaking or stiffness of the body, back pain or spasms, chest pain or tightness, chills, flushing, difficulty breathing, wheezing, becoming blue due to lack of oxygen, and tingling or numbness of the skin. In severe cases, rapid heartbeat, low blood pressure, and severe trouble breathing may occur. Your healthcare team will monitor you for these side effects. In the case of a severe infusion reaction, your CYRAMZA treatment will have to be immediately and permanently stopped.
  • CYRAMZA may worsen certain types of liver disease. Tell your doctor if you have or have had liver disease or other liver problems.
  • RPLS (reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome), a very rare but serious brain disorder, has been reported in clinical trials with CYRAMZA. Signs and symptoms of RPLS may include headache, seizures, visual changes, and changes in mental function. These symptoms usually stop or improve within days, but some patients can experience continuing changes in mental function or death.
  • Too much protein in the urine (proteinuria) has been reported in clinical trials with CYRAMZA. This may be a sign of kidney damage. Your doctor will monitor your urine protein levels during treatment. If you develop protein in your urine, your doctor may interrupt your treatment and decrease your dose of CYRAMZA. In severe cases your treatment will have to be permanently stopped.
  • Thyroid gland problems have been reported in clinical trials with CYRAMZA. Your doctor will do blood tests to monitor your thyroid gland function during treatment.
  • CYRAMZA can harm your unborn baby. You should avoid getting pregnant, and use adequate contraception while receiving CYRAMZA and for at least 3 months after stopping CYRAMZA.

What are the most common side effects of CYRAMZA?

  • The most common side effects reported in patients treated with CYRAMZA when given in combination with FOLFIRI (irinotecan, folinic acid, and 5fluorouracil) were diarrhea; low white blood cell count; decreased appetite; nosebleeds; mouth sores; low platelet count; high blood pressure; swelling in the arms, legs, hands, or feet; too much protein in the urine; handfoot syndrome; bleeding in the gastrointestinal tract; and low albumin (a protein in the blood). The most common serious adverse events with CYRAMZA plus FOLFIRI were diarrhea, blockage of the intestine, and low white blood cell count with fever. Treatment to increase white blood cell count called granulocyte colonystimulating factors was given to 20% of patients treated with CYRAMZA plus FOLFIRI.

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit www.fda.gov/safety/medwatch or call 1800FDA1088.

What should I tell my doctor before receiving treatment with CYRAMZA?

Before you receive CYRAMZA, tell your doctor if you:

  • Have had or are at high risk for strokes or heart attack.
  • Have high blood pressure or have blood pressure problems.
  • Are planning to have surgery of any kind.
  • Have or have had liver problems, including liver cirrhosis or other diseases of the liver.
  • Are pregnant or may be pregnant: CYRAMZA can harm your unborn baby. You should avoid getting pregnant, and use adequate contraception while receiving CYRAMZA and for at least 3 months after stopping CYRAMZA.
  • Are breastfeeding: your doctor will tell you to stop breastfeeding during treatment.

Tell your doctor about all the medications you are taking, including prescription and overthecounter medications.

How is CYRAMZA given?

  • CYRAMZA is slowly infused (injected) into your vein. The infusion will last about 60 minutes. You will usually receive CYRAMZA once every 2 weeks prior to FOLFIRI.
  • Your doctor will also give additional medication(s) prior to your CYRAMZA infusion to address potential side effects.

CYRAMZA is available by prescription only.

Please see full Prescribing InformationPrescribing Information for additional information about CYRAMZA, including Boxed Warnings for severe bleeding, tears in the stomach or bowel wall, and difficulty in wound healing.

RB-C CON ISI 02NOV2015

CYRAMZA is used with a chemotherapy combination called FOLFIRI (irinotecan, folinic acid, and 5-fluorouracil) to treat metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC) in patients whose cancer has progressed after being treated with other certain types of chemotherapy.

By calling this number, you’ll have access to a healthcare professional who can provide additional information similar to what you can find on this website. The toll-free number is a service provided by Eli Lilly and Company and is not intended to replace the advice of your healthcare team.

If you have a medical emergency, you should immediately call 911 (or your local emergency services number). If you are seeking medical advice, you should direct those questions to your healthcare team. Your own healthcare team is the best source of information regarding your health.

Indication

CYRAMZA is used with a chemotherapy combination called FOLFIRI (irinotecan, folinic acid, and 5-fluorouracil) to treat metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC) in patients whose cancer has progressed after being treated with other certain types of chemotherapy.

Important Safety Information

What is the most important information I should know about CYRAMZA?

WARNING: SEVERE BLEEDING, TEARS IN THE STOMACH OR BOWEL WALL, AND DIFFICULTY IN WOUND HEALING

Severe bleeding has occurred with CYRAMZA. These events are sometimes fatal. Tell your doctor right away if you have bleeding or symptoms of bleeding, including lightheadedness. Your treatment will have to be permanently stopped if severe bleeding occurs.

Tears in the stomach or bowel wall may occur with CYRAMZA. These events are sometimes fatal. Tell your doctor if you have severe diarrhea, vomiting, or severe abdominal pain. Your treatment will have to be permanently stopped if this occurs.

Wounds may have difficulty healing with drugs like CYRAMZA. Tell your doctor if you have a wound that doesn’t heal properly. If you develop a wound that won’t heal during treatment, your doctor will stop CYRAMZA until the wound is fully healed. Also tell your doctor if you have planned surgery, as CYRAMZA treatment should be interrupted prior to surgery. Your doctor may restart CYRAMZA after your surgical wound has healed.

  • Strokes, ministrokes, blood clots, and heart attacks have occurred in clinical trials with CYRAMZA. These events are sometimes fatal. Your treatment will have to be permanently stopped if these events occur.
  • Severe high blood pressure has occurred with CYRAMZA treatment. Your doctor will monitor your blood pressure every two weeks or more throughout treatment and may adjust, interrupt, or permanently stop treatment depending on the results. Tell your doctor if your blood pressure is high or if you have symptoms of high blood pressure, including severe headache or lightheadedness, or neurologic symptoms such as confusion, changes in your vision, or seizure.
  • Infusion reactions related to injecting CYRAMZA have occurred. Most of these reactions happened during or after the first or second CYRAMZA infusion. Signs and symptoms of infusion reactions include shaking or stiffness of the body, back pain or spasms, chest pain or tightness, chills, flushing, difficulty breathing, wheezing, becoming blue due to lack of oxygen, and tingling or numbness of the skin. In severe cases, rapid heartbeat, low blood pressure, and severe trouble breathing may occur. Your healthcare team will monitor you for these side effects. In the case of a severe infusion reaction, your CYRAMZA treatment will have to be immediately and permanently stopped.
  • CYRAMZA may worsen certain types of liver disease. Tell your doctor if you have or have had liver disease or other liver problems.
  • RPLS (reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome), a very rare but serious brain disorder, has been reported in clinical trials with CYRAMZA. Signs and symptoms of RPLS may include headache, seizures, visual changes, and changes in mental function. These symptoms usually stop or improve within days, but some patients can experience continuing changes in mental function or death.
  • Too much protein in the urine (proteinuria) has been reported in clinical trials with CYRAMZA. This may be a sign of kidney damage. Your doctor will monitor your urine protein levels during treatment. If you develop protein in your urine, your doctor may interrupt your treatment and decrease your dose of CYRAMZA. In severe cases your treatment will have to be permanently stopped.
  • Thyroid gland problems have been reported in clinical trials with CYRAMZA. Your doctor will do blood tests to monitor your thyroid gland function during treatment.
  • CYRAMZA can harm your unborn baby. You should avoid getting pregnant, and use adequate contraception while receiving CYRAMZA and for at least 3 months after stopping CYRAMZA.

What are the most common side effects of CYRAMZA?

  • The most common side effects reported in patients treated with CYRAMZA when given in combination with FOLFIRI (irinotecan, folinic acid, and 5fluorouracil) were diarrhea; low white blood cell count; decreased appetite; nosebleeds; mouth sores; low platelet count; high blood pressure; swelling in the arms, legs, hands, or feet; too much protein in the urine; handfoot syndrome; bleeding in the gastrointestinal tract; and low albumin (a protein in the blood). The most common serious adverse events with CYRAMZA plus FOLFIRI were diarrhea, blockage of the intestine, and low white blood cell count with fever. Treatment to increase white blood cell count called granulocyte colonystimulating factors was given to 20% of patients treated with CYRAMZA plus FOLFIRI.

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit www.fda.gov/safety/medwatch or call 1800FDA1088.

What should I tell my doctor before receiving treatment with CYRAMZA?

Before you receive CYRAMZA, tell your doctor if you:

  • Have had or are at high risk for strokes or heart attack.
  • Have high blood pressure or have blood pressure problems.
  • Are planning to have surgery of any kind.
  • Have or have had liver problems, including liver cirrhosis or other diseases of the liver.
  • Are pregnant or may be pregnant: CYRAMZA can harm your unborn baby. You should avoid getting pregnant, and use adequate contraception while receiving CYRAMZA and for at least 3 months after stopping CYRAMZA.
  • Are breastfeeding: your doctor will tell you to stop breastfeeding during treatment.

Tell your doctor about all the medications you are taking, including prescription and overthecounter medications.

How is CYRAMZA given?

  • CYRAMZA is slowly infused (injected) into your vein. The infusion will last about 60 minutes. You will usually receive CYRAMZA once every 2 weeks prior to FOLFIRI.
  • Your doctor will also give additional medication(s) prior to your CYRAMZA infusion to address potential side effects.

CYRAMZA is available by prescription only.

Please see full Prescribing InformationPrescribing Information for additional information about CYRAMZA, including Boxed Warnings for severe bleeding, tears in the stomach or bowel wall, and difficulty in wound healing.

RB-C CON ISI 02NOV2015