Find the educational and advocacy support you need

Whether you’re looking for answers for you or your loved ones, want to connect with other people with advanced stomach or gastroesophageal junction (GEJ) cancer, or need help getting the care you need, there are many organizations that offer useful information, networking, and other support services. Here is a list of just a few organizations dedicated to helping people who have cancer.

These resources are independent of Lilly; Lilly does not control the content.

EDUCATION

  • Debbie’s Dream Foundation: Curing Stomach Cancer

    Debbie’s Dream Foundation is a nonprofit organization dedicated to raising awareness about stomach cancer, advancing funding for research, and providing education and support internationally to patients, families, and caregivers.

    Stomach Cancer 101 provides helpful information about different aspects of a stomach cancer diagnosis and treatment.

    The Lecture Library contains lectures from the Stomach Cancer Education Symposium, hosted by Debbie’s Dream Foundation, which cover all aspects of a stomach cancer diagnosis. These lectures will help you better understand stomach cancer and provide you with information to discuss with your treatment team.

  • Cancer Support Community®

    The Cancer Support Community is a global nonprofit dedicated to providing support, education, and hope to people affected by cancer. The organization’s services are available free of charge through a network of professionally led, communitybased centers, hospitals, and community oncology practices, as well as online.

    Explore information and resources specific to stomach cancer.

CAREGIVER SUPPORT

  • Debbie’s Dream Foundation: Curing Stomach Cancer

    Debbie’s Dream Foundation is a nonprofit organization dedicated to raising awareness about stomach cancer, advancing funding for research, and providing education and support internationally to patients, families, and caregivers.

    As a caregiver, it’s important that you have a support system. Debbie’s Dream Foundation offers a stomach cancer support community, which connects people who have cancer, families, friends, and caregivers for support and inspiration.

  • CancerCare®

    Founded in 1944, CancerCare is a national organization providing free professional support services and information to help people manage the emotional, practical, and financial challenges of cancer. The organization's comprehensive services include counseling and support groups over the phone, online, and in person; educational workshops; publications; and financial and copayment assistance. All CancerCare services are provided by oncology social workers and worldleading cancer experts.

    The professional oncology social workers at CancerCare provide tips and advice for caregivers, including how you can help manage your loved one’s care, supporting your loved one emotionally, and caring for yourself.

  • Cancer Support Community®

    The Cancer Support Community is a global nonprofit dedicated to providing support, education, and hope to people affected by cancer. The organization’s services are available free of charge through a network of professionally led, communitybased centers, hospitals, and community oncology practices, as well as online.

    Dealing with a stomach cancer diagnosis can be difficult for everyone involved, including family and friends. It can be an especially difficult conversation for children. There are resources and community groups available to help.

COUNSELING AND SUPPORT

  • Debbie’s Dream Foundation: Curing Stomach Cancer

    Debbie’s Dream Foundation is a nonprofit organization dedicated to raising awareness about stomach cancer, advancing funding for research, and providing education and support internationally to patients, families, and caregivers.

    After a diagnosis of stomach cancer, Debbie’s Dream Foundation encourages you to join the free Patient Resource Education Program (PREP). In this program, people who have cancer and their families are connected with a mentor who will help them every step of the way through the cancer journey. In order to get started, fill out a Resource Inquiry Form, and Debbie’s Dream Foundation will start matching you with a mentor.

    Debbie’s Dream Foundation also offers a stomach cancer support community, which connects people who have cancer, families, friends, and caregivers for support and inspiration.

  • Cancer Support Community®

    The Cancer Support Community is a global nonprofit dedicated to providing support, education, and hope to people affected by cancer. The organization’s services are available free of charge through a network of professionally led, communitybased centers, hospitals, and community oncology practices, as well as online.

    As you go through your treatment journey, it’s important to seek emotional support for your wellbeing. There are resources and community groups available to help. You can also seek help by calling us at 1-888-793-9355.

ADVOCACY

  • Debbie’s Dream Foundation: Curing Stomach Cancer

    Debbie’s Dream Foundation is a nonprofit organization dedicated to raising awareness about stomach cancer, advancing funding for research, and providing education and support internationally to patients, families, and caregivers.

    Whether you are fighting cancer or supporting a loved one in his or her battle, you can get involved with advocacy movements that will help get research funding for stomach cancer.

  • Cancer Support Community®

    The Cancer Support Community (CSC) is a global nonprofit dedicated to providing support, education, and hope to people affected by cancer. The organization’s services are available free of charge through a network of professionally led, communitybased centers, hospitals, and community oncology practices, as well as online.

    The CSC promotes fundraising efforts, education, and community events to help raise awareness of the stomach cancer community. Learn about the ways you can get involved.

FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE AND TRANSPORTATION

  • CancerCare®

    Founded in 1944, CancerCare is a national organization providing free professional support services and information to help people manage the emotional, practical, and financial challenges of cancer. The organization’s comprehensive services include counseling and support groups over the phone, online, and in person; educational workshops; publications; and financial and co-payment assistance. All CancerCare services are provided by oncology social workers and world-leading cancer experts.

    CancerCare provides limited financial assistance to people affected by cancer. As a nonprofit organization, funding depends on the sources of support at any given time. If CancerCare does not currently have funding to assist you, its professional oncology social workers will always work to refer you to other financial assistance resources.

WELLNESS AND NUTRITION

  • Debbie’s Dream Foundation: Curing Stomach Cancer

    Debbie’s Dream Foundation is a nonprofit organization dedicated to raising awareness about stomach cancer, advancing funding for research, and providing education and support internationally to patients, families, and caregivers.

    When diagnosed with a complex disease like stomach cancer, having a nutritional plan is important. The Lecture Library contains lectures from experts who discuss the building blocks of a healthy diet and nutritional needs throughout your treatment. Our Stomach Cancer 101 also features in-depth information about nutrition during treatment and after surgery.

This information has been provided by the listed organizations, and Lilly is not responsible for the content. Its use on this site is not intended to serve as an endorsement of the listed organizations.

All thirdparty organization names and other trademarks are the property of their respective trademark owners. Those trademark owners are not affiliated with Lilly and they do not sponsor or endorse this material.

Important Safety Information

What is the most important information I should know about CYRAMZA?

WARNING: SEVERE BLEEDING, TEARS IN THE STOMACH OR BOWEL WALL, AND DIFFICULTY IN WOUND HEALING

Severe bleeding has occurred with CYRAMZA. These events are sometimes fatal. Tell your doctor right away if you have bleeding or symptoms of bleeding, including lightheadedness. Your treatment will have to be permanently stopped if severe bleeding occurs.

Tears in the stomach or bowel wall may occur with CYRAMZA. These events are sometimes fatal. Tell your doctor if you have severe diarrhea, vomiting, or severe abdominal pain. Your treatment will have to be permanently stopped if this occurs.

Wounds may have difficulty healing with drugs like CYRAMZA. Tell your doctor if you have a wound that doesn’t heal properly. If you develop a wound that won’t heal during treatment, your doctor will stop CYRAMZA until the wound is fully healed. Also tell your doctor if you have planned surgery, as CYRAMZA treatment should be interrupted prior to surgery. Your doctor may restart CYRAMZA after your surgical wound has healed.

  • Strokes, ministrokes, blood clots, and heart attacks have occurred in clinical trials with CYRAMZA. These events are sometimes fatal. Your treatment will have to be permanently stopped if these events occur.
  • Severe high blood pressure has occurred with CYRAMZA treatment. Your doctor will monitor your blood pressure every two weeks or more throughout treatment and may adjust, interrupt, or permanently stop treatment depending on the results. Tell your doctor if your blood pressure is high or if you have symptoms of high blood pressure, including severe headache or lightheadedness, or neurologic symptoms such as confusion, changes in your vision, or seizure.
  • Infusion reactions related to injecting CYRAMZA have occurred. Most of these reactions happened during or after the first or second CYRAMZA infusion. Signs and symptoms of infusion reactions include shaking or stiffness of the body, back pain or spasms, chest pain or tightness, chills, flushing, difficulty breathing, wheezing, becoming blue due to lack of oxygen, and tingling or numbness of the skin. In severe cases, rapid heartbeat, low blood pressure, and severe trouble breathing may occur. Your healthcare team will monitor you for these side effects. In the case of a severe infusion reaction, your CYRAMZA treatment will have to be immediately and permanently stopped.
  • CYRAMZA may worsen certain types of liver disease. Tell your doctor if you have or have had liver disease or other liver problems.
  • RPLS (reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome), a very rare but serious brain disorder, has been reported in clinical trials with CYRAMZA. Signs and symptoms of RPLS may include headache, seizures, visual changes, and changes in mental function. These symptoms usually stop or improve within days, but some patients can experience continuing changes in mental function or death.
  • Too much protein in the urine (proteinuria) has been reported in clinical trials with CYRAMZA. This may be a sign of kidney damage. Your doctor will monitor your urine protein levels during treatment. If you develop protein in your urine, your doctor may interrupt your treatment and decrease your dose of CYRAMZA. In severe cases your treatment will have to be permanently stopped.
  • Thyroid gland problems have been reported in clinical trials with CYRAMZA. Your doctor will do blood tests to monitor your thyroid gland function during treatment.
  • CYRAMZA can harm your unborn baby. You should avoid getting pregnant, and use adequate contraception while receiving CYRAMZA and for at least 3 months after stopping CYRAMZA.

What are the most common side effects of CYRAMZA?

  • The most common side effects reported in patients treated with CYRAMZA when given alone were high blood pressure, diarrhea, headache, and low sodium. The most common serious adverse events were anemia (a decrease in red blood cells) and blockage of the intestine. Red blood cell transfusions were given to 11% of CYRAMZAtreated patients and 8.7% of patients who received placebo.
  • The most common side effects reported in patients treated with CYRAMZA when given in combination with paclitaxel were tiredness; low white blood cell count; diarrhea; nosebleeds; high blood pressure; swelling in the arms, legs, hands, or feet; mouth sores; too much protein in the urine; low platelet count; low albumin (a protein in the blood); and bleeding in the gastrointestinal tract. The most common serious adverse events were low white blood cell count and low white blood cell count with fever; 19% of patients treated with CYRAMZA plus paclitaxel were given treatment to increase white blood cell count called granulocyte colonystimulating factors.

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit www.fda.gov/safety/medwatch or call 1800FDA1088.

What should I tell my doctor before receiving treatment with CYRAMZA?

Before you receive CYRAMZA, tell your doctor if you:

  • Have had or are at high risk for strokes or heart attack.
  • Have high blood pressure or have blood pressure problems.
  • Are planning to have surgery of any kind.
  • Have or have had liver problems, including liver cirrhosis or other diseases of the liver.
  • Are pregnant or may be pregnant: CYRAMZA can harm your unborn baby. You should avoid getting pregnant, and use adequate contraception while receiving CYRAMZA and for at least 3 months after stopping CYRAMZA.
  • Are breastfeeding: your doctor will tell you to stop breastfeeding during treatment.

Tell your doctor about all the medications you are taking, including prescription and over-the-counter medications.

How is CYRAMZA given?

  • CYRAMZA is slowly infused (injected) into your vein. The infusion will last about 60 minutes. You will usually receive CYRAMZA once every 2 weeks.
  • Your doctor will also give additional medication(s) prior to your CYRAMZA infusion to address potential side effects.

CYRAMZA is available by prescription only.

Please see full Prescribing InformationPrescribing Information for additional information about CYRAMZA, including Boxed Warnings for severe bleeding, tears in the stomach or bowel wall, and difficulty in wound healing.

RB-G CON ISI 02NOV2015

CYRAMZA is used alone or in combination with paclitaxel (a type of chemotherapy) to treat specific kinds of advanced cancer of the stomach or where the stomach and esophagus meet. CYRAMZA is for patients whose cancer has progressed after being treated with certain types of chemotherapy. CYRAMZA is given through an intravenous infusion (IV).

By calling this number, you’ll have access to a healthcare professional who can provide additional information similar to what you can find on this website. The toll-free number is a service provided by Eli Lilly and Company and is not intended to replace the advice of your healthcare team.

If you have a medical emergency, you should immediately call 911 (or your local emergency services number). If you are seeking medical advice, you should direct those questions to your healthcare team. Your own healthcare team is the best source of information regarding your health.

Indication

CYRAMZA is used alone or in combination with paclitaxel (a type of chemotherapy) to treat specific kinds of advanced cancer of the stomach or where the stomach and esophagus meet. CYRAMZA is for patients whose cancer has progressed after being treated with certain types of chemotherapy. CYRAMZA is given through an intravenous infusion (IV).

Important Safety Information

What is the most important information I should know about CYRAMZA?

WARNING: SEVERE BLEEDING, TEARS IN THE STOMACH OR BOWEL WALL, AND DIFFICULTY IN WOUND HEALING

Severe bleeding has occurred with CYRAMZA. These events are sometimes fatal. Tell your doctor right away if you have bleeding or symptoms of bleeding, including lightheadedness. Your treatment will have to be permanently stopped if severe bleeding occurs.

Tears in the stomach or bowel wall may occur with CYRAMZA. These events are sometimes fatal. Tell your doctor if you have severe diarrhea, vomiting, or severe abdominal pain. Your treatment will have to be permanently stopped if this occurs.

Wounds may have difficulty healing with drugs like CYRAMZA. Tell your doctor if you have a wound that doesn’t heal properly. If you develop a wound that won’t heal during treatment, your doctor will stop CYRAMZA until the wound is fully healed. Also tell your doctor if you have planned surgery, as CYRAMZA treatment should be interrupted prior to surgery. Your doctor may restart CYRAMZA after your surgical wound has healed.

  • Strokes, ministrokes, blood clots, and heart attacks have occurred in clinical trials with CYRAMZA. These events are sometimes fatal. Your treatment will have to be permanently stopped if these events occur.
  • Severe high blood pressure has occurred with CYRAMZA treatment. Your doctor will monitor your blood pressure every two weeks or more throughout treatment and may adjust, interrupt, or permanently stop treatment depending on the results. Tell your doctor if your blood pressure is high or if you have symptoms of high blood pressure, including severe headache or lightheadedness, or neurologic symptoms such as confusion, changes in your vision, or seizure.
  • Infusion reactions related to injecting CYRAMZA have occurred. Most of these reactions happened during or after the first or second CYRAMZA infusion. Signs and symptoms of infusion reactions include shaking or stiffness of the body, back pain or spasms, chest pain or tightness, chills, flushing, difficulty breathing, wheezing, becoming blue due to lack of oxygen, and tingling or numbness of the skin. In severe cases, rapid heartbeat, low blood pressure, and severe trouble breathing may occur. Your healthcare team will monitor you for these side effects. In the case of a severe infusion reaction, your CYRAMZA treatment will have to be immediately and permanently stopped.
  • CYRAMZA may worsen certain types of liver disease. Tell your doctor if you have or have had liver disease or other liver problems.
  • RPLS (reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome), a very rare but serious brain disorder, has been reported in clinical trials with CYRAMZA. Signs and symptoms of RPLS may include headache, seizures, visual changes, and changes in mental function. These symptoms usually stop or improve within days, but some patients can experience continuing changes in mental function or death.
  • Too much protein in the urine (proteinuria) has been reported in clinical trials with CYRAMZA. This may be a sign of kidney damage. Your doctor will monitor your urine protein levels during treatment. If you develop protein in your urine, your doctor may interrupt your treatment and decrease your dose of CYRAMZA. In severe cases your treatment will have to be permanently stopped.
  • Thyroid gland problems have been reported in clinical trials with CYRAMZA. Your doctor will do blood tests to monitor your thyroid gland function during treatment.
  • CYRAMZA can harm your unborn baby. You should avoid getting pregnant, and use adequate contraception while receiving CYRAMZA and for at least 3 months after stopping CYRAMZA.

What are the most common side effects of CYRAMZA?

  • The most common side effects reported in patients treated with CYRAMZA when given alone were high blood pressure, diarrhea, headache, and low sodium. The most common serious adverse events were anemia (a decrease in red blood cells) and blockage of the intestine. Red blood cell transfusions were given to 11% of CYRAMZAtreated patients and 8.7% of patients who received placebo.
  • The most common side effects reported in patients treated with CYRAMZA when given in combination with paclitaxel were tiredness; low white blood cell count; diarrhea; nosebleeds; high blood pressure; swelling in the arms, legs, hands, or feet; mouth sores; too much protein in the urine; low platelet count; low albumin (a protein in the blood); and bleeding in the gastrointestinal tract. The most common serious adverse events were low white blood cell count and low white blood cell count with fever; 19% of patients treated with CYRAMZA plus paclitaxel were given treatment to increase white blood cell count called granulocyte colonystimulating factors.

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit www.fda.gov/safety/medwatch or call 1800FDA1088.

What should I tell my doctor before receiving treatment with CYRAMZA?

Before you receive CYRAMZA, tell your doctor if you:

  • Have had or are at high risk for strokes or heart attack.
  • Have high blood pressure or have blood pressure problems.
  • Are planning to have surgery of any kind.
  • Have or have had liver problems, including liver cirrhosis or other diseases of the liver.
  • Are pregnant or may be pregnant: CYRAMZA can harm your unborn baby. You should avoid getting pregnant, and use adequate contraception while receiving CYRAMZA and for at least 3 months after stopping CYRAMZA.
  • Are breastfeeding: your doctor will tell you to stop breastfeeding during treatment.

Tell your doctor about all the medications you are taking, including prescription and over-the-counter medications.

How is CYRAMZA given?

  • CYRAMZA is slowly infused (injected) into your vein. The infusion will last about 60 minutes. You will usually receive CYRAMZA once every 2 weeks.
  • Your doctor will also give additional medication(s) prior to your CYRAMZA infusion to address potential side effects.

CYRAMZA is available by prescription only.

Please see full Prescribing InformationPrescribing Information for additional information about CYRAMZA, including Boxed Warnings for severe bleeding, tears in the stomach or bowel wall, and difficulty in wound healing.

RB-G CON ISI 02NOV2015